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Here’s What’s Weird and Wonderful in NYC (Feb. 1 Edition)

February 1, 2019 by Josh Waldman
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Tomorrow is Groundhog Day — perhaps the weirdest and most wonderful national holiday aside from National Meatball Day (no really, look it up). To help you prepare for Punxsutawney Phil’s iron-fisted ruling, we’re back with our list of the weirdest, most wonderful happenings in New York City. From a night of top-notch comedy to a talk with Dame Helen Mirren, there’s something here for everyone (six additional weeks of winter notwithstanding).

We Are the Tigers
Manhattan, Downtown
Musical, Comedy

This musical dark comedy stars the Tigers, a remarkably average high school cheerleading team, as they deal with drama, murder, and saving the world. You know, regular stuff.

 

An Evening with Dame Helen Mirren
Manhattan, Uptown
Discussion

We love Helen Mirren. No really — we LOVE her. This event will feature the dame herself answering questions about her new movie, “Woman in Gold.”

Accomplice the Village
Manhattan, Downtown
Immersive

This immersive experience takes you through the streets of adorable Greenwich Village on a “rescue” mission. Explore a little. Talk a little. Drink a little (thanks to your two free drink tickets).

West Side Comedy MVPs
Manhattan, Downtown
Off-Broadway, Comedy

So your favorite ticketing company walks into a bar…or not. Head to West Side Comedy Club for a night of great food and top-notch comedy.

Lincoln Center’s American Songbook
Manhattan, Lincoln Center
Concert

This series of concerts features some of America’s most esteemed singers and songwriters. Christine Ebersole, St. Vincent, Tony Yazbeck, and more are slated to appear.

Red Room Orchestra: Music of Twin Peaks
Manhattan, Uptown
Concert

Join the Red Room Orchestra as they present their version of the soundtrack to David Lynch’s masterwork. Did we mention Margaret Cho will be there?

Iolanta/Bluebeard
Manhattan, Lincoln Center
Concert 

This two-for-one staging of the classics by Tchaikovsky and Bartók highlights both works’ themes of love, intrigue, and murder.