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About A View from the Bridge

Brooklyn dockworker Eddie Carbone and his wife Beatrice agree to take in two Sicilian relatives – illegal immigrants trying to find work. Hardworking Marco is sending money home to his wife and sick children. Rodolpho is chasing the American dream, but finds being different makes him an outsider. When Rodolpho falls for Eddie’s niece Catherine, the protective uncle must confront his own feelings and his jealous mistrust threatens to expose an unspeakable secret.

Arthur Miller’s tragic masterpiece A View from the Bridge confronts the American dream in a stripped-back, muscular drama that simmers with tension and explodes with passion. We might be in 1950s Brooklyn, but the themes of family, loyalty, immigration and justice are as relevant for contemporary Australia as ever before.

Since it first premiered in 1955, A View from the Bridge has electrified audiences around the world. In the hands of award-winning director Iain Sinclair (The Beast), whose 2017 Sydney staging for Red Line Productions created a chorus of critical acclaim, this brand new production promises to be a riveting and emotionally-charged night at the theatre, featuring Daniela Farinacci (Lantana).

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One of the most explosive stories in American drama, Arthur Miller’s “A View From the Bridge,” is a collision of Old World and New World. Dockworker Eddie Carbone is a pillar of the community, proudly Italian-American, a tireless worker, and provider for his family. But he’s also a man tragically unaware of how far his protective feelings toward his teenaged niece Catherine – the girl he raised as his own daughter – have strayed into the realms of obsession.

“I believe that the common man is as apt a subject for tragedy in its highest sense as kings were,” wrote Arthur Miller in the New York Times in 1949. The tragic flaw of the ordinary man, he continued, “need be nothing, but his inherent unwillingness to remain passive in the face of what he conceives to be a challenge to his dignity, his image of his rightful status.”

So it is for waterfront worker Eddie Carbone, the protagonist of Miller’s gripping 1955 drama set in Red Hook, a dockland burg in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. Based on a true story, Miller calls on the tragic force of Ancient Greek tragedy to depict a man blind to his own failings in a tale that resonates powerfully in the 21st century world of mass migration and xenophobia. Iain Sinclair directs this all-new Melbourne Theatre Company production, starring Steve Bastoni as Eddie, Zoe Terakes as Catherine and Marco Chiappi as Alfieri, the lawyer who watches the tragedy unfold.

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What To Watch For

  • Zoe Terakes made her award-winning stage debut in 2017 in an earlier incarnation of “A View From the Bridge,” directed by Sinclair in the 50-seat Old Fitzroy Theatre in Sydney. She was studying for her HSC at the time. She shared the Best Newcomer Award in the Sydney Theatre Awards with Maggie McKenna (“Muriel’s Wedding”).
  • Miller first heard the story while researching the background to a movie project to be called “The Hook,” a story of Mob corruption in the docklands. But when pressured to twist the story into an anti-communist tirade, Miller quit the project – which, with a different screenwriter on board, eventually became “On the Waterfront.”
  • There’s a stage kiss like no other. When Eddie comes home drunk and finds Catherine and Rodolpho together, his response is to furiously force a kiss on both his niece and her boyfriend.

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Run Time

TBD

Start Date

End Date

Southbank Theatre, The Sumner

140 Southbank Blvd, Melbourne, VIC 3006

9 March - 18 April

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